Welcome to Goa....

Template by w3.css

Beach town in Goa: Panaji

It is Goa where you can have a vacation of a lifetime. Goa is a lush green paradise edged on the one side by the wooden foothills of the Sahyadri range and on the other by the Arabian Sea.

Variously known as "Rome of the East", "Tourist Paradise" and "Pearl of the Orient", the state of Goa is located on the western coast of India in the coastal belt known as Konkan.
The magnificent scenic beauty and the architectural splendours of its temples, churches and old houses have made Goa a firm favourite with travellers around the world.
But then, Goa is much more than just beaches and sea. It has a soul which goes deep into unique history, rich culture and some of the prettiest natural scenery that India has to offer.
Much of the real Goa is in its interiors, both inside its buildings and in the hinterland away from the coastal area.
Legends from Hindu mythology credit Lord Parshuram, an incarnation of Lord Vishnu with the creation of Goa.
Over the centuries various dynasties have ruled Goa. Rashtrakutas, Kadambas, Silaharas, Chalukyas, Bahamani Muslims and most famously the Portuguese have been rulers of Goa.
Goa was liberated by the Indian Army from Portuguese colonisation on December 19, 1961 and became an Union Territory along with the enclaves of Daman and Diu. On May 30, 1987 Goa was conferred statehood and became the 25th state of the Indian Republic.
Having been the meeting point of races, religions and cultures of East and West over the centuries, Goa has a multi-hued and distinctive lifestyle quite different from the rest of India. Hindu and Catholic communities make up almost the entire population with minority representation of Muslims and other religions.
All the communities have mutual respect towards one another and their secular outlook has given Goa a long and an unbroken tradition of religious harmony. The warm and tolerant nature of the Goan people allows them to celebrate and enjoy the festivals of various religions such as Ganesh Chaturthi, Diwali, Christmas, Easter and Id with equal enthusiasm.
The state of Maharashtra borders Goa on the north, the state of Karnataka on the south and east. The vast expanse of the Arabian Sea on the west forms the magnificent coastline for which Goa is justly famous.
Terekhol (Tiracol), Mandovi, Zuari, Chapora, Sal and Talpona are the main rivers which weave their way throughout the state forming the inland waterways adding beauty and romance to the land besides being used to transport Goa's main export commodity of Iron and Manganese ore to Mormugao Harbour. Along the way to the coast these waterways form estuaries, creeks and bays breaking the sandy, palm-fringed coastline behind which lie the fishing villages among the coconut groves.
Panaji (Panjim) is the state capital located on the banks of the Mandovi river and Vasco, Margao, Mapusa and Ponda are the other major towns. Goa is serviced by an international/national airport located at Dabolim near Vasco. An intra-state and inter-state bus network also plays an important role in getting locals and visitors alike in and around Goa.
The vast green expanse of the Sahyadri mountain range ensures that Goa has an abundance of water. The sea and rivers abound in seafood - prawns, mackerels, sardines, crabs and lobsters are the most popular with the locals and the visitors.
Along with English which is widely spoken all over Goa, Konkani and Marathi are the state languages. The national language Hindi is also well understood in most areas around the state
Goan cuisine is a blend of different influences the Goans had to endure during the centuries. The staple food in Goa is fish and rice, both among the Hindus and the Catholics. Unlike the Christian food the Hindu Goan food is not strongly influenced by the Portuguese cuisine.
Since the arrival of the Hippies in the sixties, Goa has been a major destination on the itinerary of international and domestic tourists.
The tourist season in Goa begins in late September and carries on through early March. The weather in these months is usually dry and pleasantly cool.
Then the weather gets fairly hot around May and by end of June, Goa receives the full blast of the Indian monsoon with sudden downpours and tropical thunderstorms. However it is also during the monsoon that Goa is probably at its most beautiful, with greenery sprouting all around.
Besides the natural beauty, the fabulous beaches and sunshine, travellers to Goa love the laid-back, peaceful, warm and friendly nature of the Goan people. After all, more than anywhere else on planet earth, this is a place where people really know how to relax.

Bird Watching

Goa's equitable climate and rich vegetation support an abundance of birds. Goa is a bird watcher's paradise and even those who have previously had little interest in birds will wonder at the richness of the birdlife.

Places to Visit

Panaji: Panaji is one of India's smallest and most pleasant state capital. Located on the south bank of the wide Mandovi river, it officially became the capital of Goa in 1843. The town is worth a visit as it has a lot to offer the new as well the old. In the oldest part of the town, the Portuguese heritage has survived remarkably well; there are narrow winding streets, old houses with overhanging balconies and red tiled roofs, whitewashed Churches and numerous small bars and cafes.

Margao: Margao is the main town of South Goa, even though rapid urbanization has transformed Margao, and it still retains some of the Old Portuguese grandeur. There are some of the old magnificent houses that remain well maintained. The richly decorated Church of the Holy Spirit is worth the visit. The main bus stand that is about 1.5 Kms away from the main town acts as a main transport center for the people of South Goa. Margao has gained more significance with the opening of the Konkan railway, which is the main railway terminus at South Goa.

Mapusa: This largest urban center of north Goa has made a mark due to the exotic weekly bazaars that are held in these town. Every Friday people ( Goans, tourists ) flock here to buy anything from an old brass lamp to garments, or even have a glimpse of how trade takes place at this famous market

Ponda: The administrative headquarters of the taluka, is situated 28kms southeast of Panaji and 17kms northeast of Margao.The Panaji-Bangalore national highway NH4 passes through Ponda. Its proximity to some of the state's largest iron ore mines has lead to spring up of small factories and industrial estates on the outskirts of the town. One of the main tourist's attractions is the Safa masjid, Goa's best-preserved sixteen-century Muslim monument.

Forts:

Compared to Indian standards, Goan forts are very small in size. Nonetheless, these were of immense military, political and economic importance in a land crisscrossed by rivers and canals and bordered by sea on the west. Where smooth passage of trade vessels was vital to economy, the control of these forts in fact determined the economic and political fate and stability of the rulers. Many forts built in the 16th century are situated at vantage points on the banks or faces of the rivers and the sea, controlling the passage of vessels. The old monuments, now in ruins due to neglect, disuse, vandalism and natural destruction, are a mute testimony to the joys and sorrows, the colourful and dark events of a bygone era. Some are awesome in sheer size like the ruins of the St. Augustine's Tower, while others are marvellous pieces of architecture, e.g. the Gate of the Adil Shah's Palace at Old Goa. In this module, we unravel these silent spectators of history.

Aguada Fort: 18 kms. From Panaji and situated on a headland of the river Mandovi, this strongest fort of Goa was built by the Portuguese in 1609-1612, to command the entry into the river Mandovi, in order to protect Old Goa from potential enemy attacks. A spring within the fort provided water supply to the ships that called there, giving it the name "Aguada" (meaning 'water' in Portuguese). On the northern side, it provides a harbour for local shipping. The fort, at present, houses the central jail. A 19th century built lighthouse is situated inside the fortress.

Cabo De Rama Fort: The southern most Goan fort, it is situated about 25 kms. South of Margao and about two hours' walk from the nearest road head. This very old fortress, now in ruins, was built before the arrival of the Portuguese. A view from the boat offers a nostalgic experience.

Cabo Raj Niwas: Built in 1540 AD opposite Fort Aguada on the south headland of the river Mandovi, this fortress housed the Franciscan monastery which later (1594 AD) became the official residence of the governor of Goa. It is an elegant mansion.

Chapora Fort: The Adil Shah of Bijapur built this fort on the southern headland of the Chapora River. It was known as Shapur and is now mostly ruined. It has a commanding view of the Vagator beach and is near to Anjuna beach.

Mormugao Fort: This fort near the internationally famous Mormugao Harbour was built to protect the harbour situated near the Vasco da Gama town. Its work started in 1624. It covered an area of six miles in circumference, contained towering bulwarks, three magazines, five prisons, a chapel and quarters for the guard. It had 53 guns and a garrison with 4 officers, and was an important fortress on the western coast. However, except the chapel and a portion of the boundary wall, little is left of this fort.

Teracol (Tiracol) Fort: TERACOL (TIRACOL) FORT It was a key Portuguese fort for the defence of Goa, on the north side of the estuary of the Tiracol river, the most northern boundary of Goa. This fort is marked by decorative turrets and dry moat with commanding views of the estuary and ocean. The church set in the middle of the fortress has a classical late Goan façade. The fort presently houses a tourist hotel. The beach is situated at the confluence of river and sea and generally recognised for its tranquility.

The Gate of the College of St. Paul: St. Paul, once the principal institution of Jesuits in India for imparting knowledge on Christianity, was built over the ruins of a mosque south of St. Cajetan's church at Old Goa in 1542. However, it was abandoned during the outbreak of plague in 1570 and went into disuse. The Government demolished this ruining structure in 1832 to carry materials for building construction in Panaji. The only remnant of this College is the façade in the shape of an arch with a niche at the top and a cross crowning it. The arch that led to the College as a gateway is built of laterite, flanked on either side by a basalt column of the Corinthian order on raised plinth, and supported by basalt pilasters of the Doric order.

The Gate of the Palace of Adil Shah: The palace of Adil Shah at Old Goa was the most prominent building with magnificent lofty staircases. It was the residence of the Portuguese governors till 1695, and was afterwards used by them on festive occasions. It was deserted during the epidemic in the 18th century, was demolished in 1820 and the materials carried to Panaji for construction of houses. Now only the gate remains which is architecturally purely brahminical in style. Six steps in front of the gate lead to the raised platform on which the gate stands.

The Tower of the Church of St. Augustine: Built in 1602, the only ruin of the Church of St. Augustine on the Holy Hill at Old Goa near the Nunnery, is a lofty 46-metre high tower defying the torrential rains. The tower is one of the four of St. Augustine Church that once stood there. The Church when intact was perhaps the biggest in Goa. With the religious suppression in 1835, the Augustinians deserted the church and the convent. The neglect resulted in the collapse of the vault on September 8, 1842. The façade and half of the tower fell in 1931 and some more parts of it collapsed in 1938.

The Viceroy`s Arch: It is one of the gates of Adil Shah's Fort at Old Goa. It was renovated by the Portuguese and was the gateway to Goa for Portuguese Governors. Every incoming Viceroy used to disembark at this place. The arch was rebuilt by the Governor Francisco de Gama (1597-1600) in the memory of his great-grandfather Vasco da Gama. It was again completely re-built in 1954.

Quote of the day: In Cyprus, we are very lucky to speak in such a beautiful dialect, namely the Cypriot Greek dialect.

Need to stay in Cyprus, Limassol? Than you will be making an excellent decision to rent villa in Cyprus. The most houses are located in luxury resorts and will give you a great privacy with fantastic view on the coast, but if you want to jump into the crowd all the famous locations are very close driving. Cyprus boasts many historical attractions that combine between beauty and culture. Many tourists choose to discover the true soul of Cyprus in districts like Limassol and the traditional houses. Choosing a villa for rent in Cyprus would be a showcase of luxury and modernity. Villas usually reflect the status and social class of their owners that is why many investor choose to have business meetings in their villas.